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Is driving a long-distance truck the perfect cover for a serial killer?

If there is a perfect job for a serial killer, it is probably that of a long-distance truck driver.

They are often solitary and lead a nomadic lifestyle that involves constant travel across state and jurisdictional lines, giving them easy access to numerous potential victims and allowing truck drivers to evade prosecution for years.

A new book by former FBI Deputy Director for Counterintelligence Frank Figliuzzi – Long Haul: Hunting serial killers on the highway – offers a terrifying insight into the world of these American serial killer truck drivers.

According to the FBI’s Highway Serial Killings Initiative, at least 850 murders along American highways over the past decades have been linked to truck drivers.

Keith Hunter Jesperson, a Canadian truck driver best known as the “Happy Face Killer,” terrorized women at rest stops and bars across the country in the early 1990s, killing his prey in at least five states during his murder spree.

In previous discussions with The Independent, He casually told stories about strangling women when they upset him and then disposing of their bodies, which he referred to as “taking care of his business.”

A new book by former FBI Assistant Director for Counterintelligence Frank Figliuzzi delves into the world of America's serial killer truck drivers (Frank Figliuzzi)A new book by former FBI Assistant Director for Counterintelligence Frank Figliuzzi delves into the world of America's serial killer truck drivers (Frank Figliuzzi)

A new book by former FBI Assistant Director for Counterintelligence Frank Figliuzzi delves into the world of America’s serial killer truck drivers (Frank Figliuzzi)

One woman was determined to continue to her destination, while Jesperson was determined to sleep.

“I said, ‘Just let me sleep for four hours and everything will be fine,'” he told the True Crime Podcast The lighter side of serial killers. “About 20 minutes later, she kept pushing me. I got angry and she died.”

Figliuzzi said his investigation found that the truck drivers’ work allowed them to “grab a victim in one jurisdiction, kill him in a second jurisdiction, dump the body in a third jurisdiction – and be gone again before anyone found out.”

And Jesperson himself explains exactly how transporting helped him get rid of bodies. He feared that the victim could be linked to him because he assumed she had a criminal record and had used his credit card to make a call, so he decided to remove her identity.

“I thought, ‘I can put the body under my truck, drag it down I-80 and eliminate her identity, at least her facial features or fingerprints and so on.'” And that’s what he did.

Keith Jesperson was called the “Happy Face Killer” (booking photo from December 2009)Keith Jesperson was called the “Happy Face Killer” (booking photo from December 2009)

Keith Jesperson was called the “Happy Face Killer” (booking photo from December 2009)

Later that same decade, another truck driver – Wayne Adam Ford – walked into the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office in California and confessed to killing four women. He then handed over a plastic bag containing the breast of one of his victims.

And then there is the “Truck Stop Killer” Robert Ben Rhoades, who set up a torture chamber in the back of his truck where he kidnapped, tortured, raped and killed up to 50 suspected victims.

These men are among America’s most notorious serial killers. They were caught and will spend the rest of their lives in prison, but hundreds more remain at large.

More than 200 highway murder cases remain open and unsolved, and the FBI is working through a list of about 450 suspects.

The book also highlights Bruce Mendenhall, who, like Rhoades, is known as the “Truck Stop Killer” or “Rest Stop Killer” as well as the “Prosti Shooter.” The blood of numerous murdered women was found in his truck.

He was convicted of one murder and is accused of killing three other women at rest stops in Alabama, Indiana and Tennessee. He is still under investigation for murder in Georgia, Illinois, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas.

Dellmus Colvin, the “Interstate Strangler,” reportedly killed between 47 and 52 women, most of them sex workers, for the sheer joy of killing and “always slept well at night,” according to the book.

“This book began as an interest in the FBI’s Highway Serial Killings Initiative, but quickly evolved into a quest to understand the cultures behind the killings,” Figliuzzi said of his book, which was released May 28.

“The truckers and the human traffickers, the professors and the pimps, the police officers and the crime analysts took me on a journey to places I didn’t expect, populated by people I never knew. They immersed me in their worlds, their realities and their stories.”

A map created by the Highway Serial Killings initiative is dotted with red dots marking the 500 locations where bodies have been discovered along American highways over the past 30 years (FBI).A map created by the Highway Serial Killings initiative is dotted with red dots marking the 500 locations where bodies have been discovered along American highways over the past 30 years (FBI).

A map created by the Highway Serial Killings initiative is dotted with red dots marking the 500 locations where bodies have been discovered along American highways over the past 30 years (FBI).

Figliuzzi accompanied a truck driver for more than 3,200 kilometers to get to know the subculture from the inside.

He concluded that the work was both mentally and physically demanding, often boring and lonely, and that it could have a negative impact on the driver’s health.

“It’s part of the negative side of the culture that they are incredibly motionless for hours. There is little or no human interaction, depending on what kind of transportation you are doing,” said Figliuzzi The guard.

So does the grueling work take a toll on truckers and drive them insane? Or are people with serial killer tendencies drawn to the profession because of the lifestyle?

“A certain personality type might be interested in long-distance travel because of their personality, because they are isolated and are perfectly comfortable with that situation and the lack of contact with others,” Figliuzzi said. The guard.

“Does this give them the opportunity to commit crimes, even murders, largely undetected, exploiting the loopholes in jurisdictions – grabbing a victim in one jurisdiction, killing them in a second jurisdiction, disposing of the body in a third jurisdiction – and getting out of there before anyone finds out? Yes.”

According to the FBI, truck drivers are responsible for most highway homicides.

“Long-distance truck drivers live in their own world for days or weeks. They speak their own language, eat in their own restaurants, sleep in their own trucks,” writes Figliuzzi in his new book.

“Part cowboy, part fighter pilot, part hermit, truck drivers glide along the edge of a certain seam in the fabric of our society – the seam that separates their reality from ours.”

Frank Figliuzzi said his research found that the work of truck drivers allows them to Frank Figliuzzi said his research found that the work of truck drivers allows them to

Frank Figliuzzi said his research found that the work of truck drivers allows them to “grab a victim in one jurisdiction, kill him in a second jurisdiction, dump the body in a third jurisdiction – and be on the road again before anyone finds out” (Provided)

Another focus is on the investigators – and their plan to combat the highway murders.

The Highway Serial Killings Initiative was launched by the FBI in 2009 to raise awareness among law enforcement and the public about this problem.

A map on the website is dotted with red dots marking the 500 locations where bodies have been discovered along America’s highways over the past 30 years.

Upon closer inspection, you can see that many of them form a horizontal lane that runs through the southern/central part of the country, following Interstate 40. I-40 from Wilmington, North Carolina, to Barstow, California.

Figliuzzi also spoke to women who had survived horrific encounters with truckers. He said part of his book is about understanding the victims, who in most cases are vulnerable women forced into sex work.

“The reason these cases remain unsolved for decades is because these killers exploit loopholes in law enforcement jurisprudence,” Figliuzzi said. The guard“The victims are often just passing through and no one knows they are missing.”

“I hope people better understand the trap of human trafficking in our society,” Figliuzzi said.

“Nobody is really advocating or speaking for these deceased victims because their lives were snuffed out.”

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